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HVC affiliate Prof. Hiroshi Maruyama one of two honorary doctors awarded by the Faculty of Arts. More.

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Public lecture with professor Hiroshi Maruyama

We welcome you to a public lecture with Professor Hiroshi Maruyama, who is visiting to receive his Honorary Doctorate at the Faculty of Philosophy and will speak on the following topic:

(In)Visible Threats to the Cultural Wellbeing of Indigenous Peoples in the Context of Japan and Sweden

There are many differences between the majority and minorities, particularly indigenous peoples, in terms of perceiving history, society and culture. In general, colonialism is invisible for the majority, while it is visible for indigenous peoples. That is to say, colonialism is yet not over as seen from the perspective of indigenous peoples. It is interwoven with globalization and nationalism. In the global north, the majority do not care about cultural wellbeing, because they can enjoy their own culture. By contrast, indigenous peoples are suffering from a lack of their own cultural wellbeing, which is invisible for the majority. In this context, this lecture tries to make visible the colonialism that still lingers in the indigenous policy in Sweden and Japan in terms of ensuring indigenous peoples’ cultural wellbeing. Also, by employing the concept human security, it attempts to make visible that the indigenous cultural wellbeing has been endangered by the exploitation of natural resources on the territories of indigenous communities.

The lecture will take place on 27 January 1:15 - 3:00 PM at English Park Campus, room 2-0076.

Welcome to the Hugo Valentin Centre

The Hugo Valentin Centre is an inter-disciplinary forum at Uppsala University with research as its prime task. Research is carried out within two prioritized areas: on the one hand phenomena and processes related to the ethnic dimension in human life, on the other hand genocide and severe crimes against human rights. To these subject fields belong minority studies and Holocaust and genocide studies as well as related and adjacent subjects where the Centre has a marked specialisation. Culture, language, history and religion are natural points of departure for the Centre's work...  Read more

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We welcome you to a public lecture with Professor Hiroshi Maruyama, who is visiting to receive his Honorary Doctorate at the Faculty of Philosophy and will speak on the following topic:

(In)Visible Threats to the Cultural Wellbeing of Indigenous Peoples in the Context of Japan and Sweden

There are many differences between the majority and minorities, particularly indigenous peoples, in terms of perceiving history, society and culture. In general, colonialism is invisible for the majority, while it is visible for indigenous peoples. That is to say, colonialism is yet not over as seen from the perspective of indigenous peoples. It is interwoven with globalization and nationalism. In the global north, the majority do not care about cultural wellbeing, because they can enjoy their own culture. By contrast, indigenous peoples are suffering from a lack of their own cultural wellbeing, which is invisible for the majority. In this context, this lecture tries to make visible the colonialism that still lingers in the indigenous policy in Sweden and Japan in terms of ensuring indigenous peoples’ cultural wellbeing. Also, by employing the concept human security, it attempts to make visible that the indigenous cultural wellbeing has been endangered by the exploitation of natural resources on the territories of indigenous communities.

The lecture will take place on 27 January 1:15 - 3:00 PM at English Park Campus, room 2-0076.