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    A global perspective on the decades of violence: "The New Empires of Violence 1930-1950"

    2015-03-02

    The Thirteenth Hugo Valentin Lecture


    German historian Dieter Pohl lectured under the heading "The New Empires of Violence 1930-1950: Global Perspectives on the Decades of Mass Violence" in the University Main Building in Uppsala on 26 February 2015.

    The 1930s and '40s go down in history as the most violent decades registered by humanity. Three countries – Italy, Japan and Germany – tried to master the global economic crisis through the creation of vast empires in nearby territories, which meant use of mass violence of an unprecedented scale, which also struck civilians and prisoners of war. Historiography has sought to explain this collapse of civilization in various terms, including militant ideologies and dictatorships, collapse of legal systems, or ethnic conflict propensity in "zones of violence," or a continuity of colonialism. In this year's Hugo Valentin Lecture, historian Dieter Pohl discussed an alternate approach based on the newborn imperial ambitions during the 1930s and early 1940s. These ambitions, propelled by extreme nationalism, included both settlement and severe exploitation, making use of both looting and organized forced labor. And all three powers used methods of massive violence to try to thwart all opposition. Nazi Germany killed more than 10 million people, Japanese occupation forces millions and Italian forces hundreds of thousands of people. Also Stalin's Soviet and the Chinese Civil War after 1927 belong to the image of the violent decades.

    Dieter Pohl is Professor of Contemporary History at the Alpen-Adria University in Klagenfurt, Austria.

    The lecture took place in Lecture Hall IV, University Main Building, Uppsala, on Thursday, February 26.


    More about Dieter Pohl and the lecture.

    Welcome to the Hugo Valentin Centre

    The Hugo Valentin Centre is an inter-disciplinary forum at Uppsala University with research as its prime task. Research is carried out within two prioritized areas: on the one hand phenomena and processes related to the ethnic dimension in human life, on the other hand genocide and severe crimes against human rights. To these subject fields belong minority studies and Holocaust and genocide studies as well as related and adjacent subjects where the Centre has a marked specialisation. Culture, language, history and religion are natural points of departure for the Centre's work...  Read more

    For more information please contact:

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    2015-03-02

    The Thirteenth Hugo Valentin Lecture


    German historian Dieter Pohl lectured under the heading "The New Empires of Violence 1930-1950: Global Perspectives on the Decades of Mass Violence" in the University Main Building in Uppsala on 26 February 2015.

    The 1930s and '40s go down in history as the most violent decades registered by humanity. Three countries – Italy, Japan and Germany – tried to master the global economic crisis through the creation of vast empires in nearby territories, which meant use of mass violence of an unprecedented scale, which also struck civilians and prisoners of war. Historiography has sought to explain this collapse of civilization in various terms, including militant ideologies and dictatorships, collapse of legal systems, or ethnic conflict propensity in "zones of violence," or a continuity of colonialism. In this year's Hugo Valentin Lecture, historian Dieter Pohl discussed an alternate approach based on the newborn imperial ambitions during the 1930s and early 1940s. These ambitions, propelled by extreme nationalism, included both settlement and severe exploitation, making use of both looting and organized forced labor. And all three powers used methods of massive violence to try to thwart all opposition. Nazi Germany killed more than 10 million people, Japanese occupation forces millions and Italian forces hundreds of thousands of people. Also Stalin's Soviet and the Chinese Civil War after 1927 belong to the image of the violent decades.

    Dieter Pohl is Professor of Contemporary History at the Alpen-Adria University in Klagenfurt, Austria.

    The lecture took place in Lecture Hall IV, University Main Building, Uppsala, on Thursday, February 26.


    More about Dieter Pohl and the lecture.